Minerals Chart

Like vitamins, minerals are also essential nutrients needed by your body in order to function properly.

Minerals help our body to turn food into energy as well as building and maintaining strong teeth and bones. Although these are the main functions, the chart below shows other benefits of minerals as well.

The main types of food minerals are found in include fish, bread, dairy products, meat as well as the standard fruit and vegetables.

Below is a minerals chart from www.thetotalman.com

The Body – Mineral Chart

Mineral What the Mineral does Effects of mineral deficiency Good food sources
Calcium Strengthens the bones and teeth. Also needed to help regulate the heartbeat and help muscle and nerve functions. Its minor deficit can affect bone and teeth formation. milk
dairy Products
green leafy vegetables
salmon
sardines
turnips
tofu
almonds
broccoli
Chromium Required for the proper metabolism of sugar in the blood. Can affect the potency of insulin in regulating sugar balance. beans
cheese
whole grain food
peas
meat
Copper Important for nerve functioning, red blood cell formation and maintaining energy levels through iron absorption. Also good for healthy bones and the immune system. Anemia, hair problems, dry skin, vitamin C deficiency beans
raisins
chocolate
nuts
meat
shellfish
Fluorine Helps to make bones and teeth stronger. Improves resistance to cavities. Weak teeth and bones. gelatin desserts
salt water fish (salmon)
tea
fluoridated water
Iodine Helps keep your thyroid glands working. Your thyroid gland helps regulate the rate at which your body carries out its necessary physiological functions. Enlargement of the thyroid gland. seafood
seaweed
dairy products
iodized salt
Iron Helps the blood and muscles carry oxygen to the body. Tiredness and lethargy, feelings of weakness, iInsomnia, palpitations. liver
red meat
egg yolk
legumes
whole / enriched grains
dark green vegetables
Magnesium Helps muscles work, aids metabolism and aids bone growth. Fatigue, numbness, poor memory, muscle twitching and iIrritability, tingling, rapid heart beat. whole grains
nuts
legumes
apricots
bananas
soy beans
green leafy vegetables
spinach
Manganese Helps bone growth and cell production. Rarely documented but one case showed in a patient a decrease in serum cholesterol, depressed growth of hair and nails, scaly dermatitis, weight loss, reddening of his black hair and beard and impaired blood clotting. whole grains
fruit
vegetables
tea
egg yolk
Molybdenum Helps cells and nerves to function. Very rare but one observation has shown apatient to have developed rapid heart and respiratory rates, headache, night blindness, and ultimately became comatose. dark green vegetables
peas
milk
beans
grains
Potassium Essential for nerve function, muscle contraction and maintainance of fluid and blood pressure in the body. Depression, fatigue, hypertension, decreased Heart Rate oranges
bananas
peanuts
beans
potatoes
spinach
Selenium Helps to prevent damage to cells and aids in the functioning of the thyroid gland. An antioxidant for the body. Poor heart function, osteoarthropathy, mental retardation brazil nuts
tuna
eggs
grains
chicken
shellfish
fish
Sodium Helps to regulate water in the body’s blood and tissue Fatigue, apathy, and nausea as well as cramps in the muscles of the extremities. table salt
dairy products
Zinc Helps wounds to heal and aids taste and smell sensory. Growth retardation, hair loss, diarrhea, delayed sexual maturation and impotence, eye and skin lesions, and loss of appetite. whole wheat
peanut
poultry
eggs
legumes
beef
shellfish

Source for Minerals Chart: www.thetotalman.com

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Vitamins Chart

Vitamins are essential nutrients needed by your body in order to function properly.

There are 2 types of vitamins:

  1. Fat Soluble: These can be found in fatty foods such as animal fat and these vitamins are stored within the body. They include vitamin A, D, E and K.
  2. Water Soluble: These include vitamin C, B(s), and folic acid. Taken in excess these vitamins pass through the body if not used.

Below is a vitamins chart from www.thetotalman.com 

The Body – Vitamin Chart

Vitamin What the Vitamin does Effects of vitamin deficiency Good food sources
Vitamin A 
(beta carotene)
Helps to keep eyesight and promote the growth of healthy skin, hair, bones and teeth. Helps in cell reproduction and aids to strengthen the immune and reproductive systems. The body uses beta-carotene and converts it to vitamin A. Night blindness, dry skin, poor bone and teeth growth and development. Soy milk (and other dairy products)
carrots
spinach
green peas
tomato juice
watermelon
sweet potatoes
pumpkins
cantaloupe
sunflower seeds
fish liver oils
liver
lean ham
mango
broccoli
lean pork chops
egg yolks
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) Used by the body to help convert carbohydrates into energy. Helps to keep the normal function of the nervous system, muscles heart and digestion. Less concentration, loss of appetite. Weakness, exhaustion and fatigue. Lean Pork
Legumes
Yeast
Bananas
Fish (most)
Liver
Nuts and seeds
Potatoes
sweet potatoes
peas
watermelon
avocado
Poultry
Whole-grain and fortified cereals
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) Important for growth in the body. Assists skin, nails and hair to grow. Helps to prevent sores and swelling of mouth and lips. Aids in reproduction and cell regeneration. Also aids in the releasing of energy from carbohydrates. Itching and irritation of lips, eyes, skin and mucous membranes. Eggs
Fish and shellfish
Fortified cereals
Meat
poultry
Dairy products
Kiwi
Avocado
Broccoli
turnip greens
asparagus
spinach
Vitamin B3
(niacin)
Helps to release energy from carbohydrates. Aids in the functioning of the digestive system, nerves and Depression, diarrhoea, dizziness, fatigue, halitosis, headaches, indigestion, insomnia, limb pains, loss of appetite, low blood sugar, muscular weakness, skin eruptions, and inflammation. Beef liver
Peanuts
Chicken, White meat
Tuna
Salmon
Almonds
Mushrooms
Corn
Mango
Lentils
Vitamin B9 (Folate/Folic acid) Helps produce and maintain red blood cells and the nervous system. Essential for mental and emotional health as it helps to maintain normal brain functions. Anaemia and a reduction in growth rates. Other subtle symptoms may include digestive disorders such as diarrhoea, loss of appetite, and weight loss can occur, as can weakness, sore tongue, headaches, heart palpitations, irritability, forgetfulness, and behavioural disorders Dark green vegetables
Dry beans
peas
lentils
Enriched grain products
Fortified cereals
Liver
Orange juice
Wheat germ
Yeast
Vitamin B12 needed for nerve cells and red blood cells, and to make DNA Demyelination and irreversible nerve cell death. Symptoms include numbness or tingling of the extremities and an ataxic gait. dairy products
eggs
cereals
soy based products
liver
beef
clams
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) Important in the production ofcollagen in the body – helps the connective tissues and organs. Can act as an anti oxidant to help protect the body from free radical. Scurvy (though rarely seen today) which causes bleeding and inflamed gums, loose teeth and poor wound healing. citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruits, lemons, limes)
berries
melons
tomatoes
potatoes
green peppers
leafy green vegetables
Vitamin D Helps to promote the absorption of calcium and phosphorus levels in the body. Helps to maintain and form strong and healthy bones. Rickets and osteomalacia. Rickets results in soft bones and skeletal deformities Liver
High-fat fish
Fish oils
Egg yolk
Fortified cereals
Fortified milk
Sunlight
Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells against the effects of free radicals, which are potentially damaging by-products of energy metabolism. Intestinal disorders – cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, and cholestasis. Prevent the absorption of dietary fats and fat-soluble nutrients. Margarine
Nuts and seeds
Peanuts and peanut butter Vegetable oils
Wheat germ
Whole-grain and fortified cereals
Vitamin K Helps to control blood clotting in the body and is essential for synthesizing the liver protein that controls the clotting A shortage of this vitamin may result in nosebleeds, internal haemorrhaging. Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Leafy green vegetables
Mayonnaise
Soybean
Canola
Olive oils

Source for Vitamins Chart: www.thetotalman.com

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Stages of Grief

We have all experienced grief, be it in the strongest form of losing a close relation to death, or the end of a relationship, down to a milder form of grief such as losing a personal possession. Whether the loss is large or small, on an emotional level, the grieving process can be applied to all levels of loss.

Experiencing Grief

Grief itself is a strong emotional process and has various stages it goes through before it can be resolved. In this sense, grief can be likened to an emotional roller-coaster ride as it involved a combination of strong emotions. The end of the grieving process leaves a marked internal change within you.

As a natural process, grief has to be worked through individually in order to maintain a healthy mind body and soul.

5 Stages of Grief

Much research has been carried out in this field, the most commonly known is by Elisabeth Kubler Ross who drew up a chart of the grieving process, breaking it down to 5 separate stages as follows:

  1. Denial: This is a defense mechanism to help you cope with the intense feelings of shock and numbness. It is a strong feeling of disbelief.
  2. Anger: This feeling of anger can be aimed at yourself or anyone around you. Knowing that this stage exists can help you to control your anger better rather than lashing out.
  3. Bargaining: At this stage, you are willing to do almost anything to reverse the hands of time and to get back the loved one. If only…
  4. Depression: This is a strong feeling of helplessness and desolation. You feel powerless to do anything and want to simply give up.
  5. Acceptance: This is the final stage when you accept loss and try to pick up the pieces of what remain and carry on. An internal change has occurred and you finally detach yourself somewhat in order to carry on with your life. Reintegration into society without the loss of the loved one is part of this final stage, although missing them becomes part of their life such as anniversaries.

The above 5 points have been extended and extra feelings have been added, but this is the basic model of grief as regarding the imminent death of self or of a close person.

Ramsay and De Groot, for example, added shock, guilt and anxiety as part of the process as well as the above 5 factors.

If the feelings during the grieving stage are not addressed properly, you can get stuck in a rut, which is known as abnormal grieving.

The extreme version of this abnormality is known as pathological grief. This affects you mentally and physically, hindering your progress in life. This is why it is important to seek external help if after a reasonable amount of time has elapsed and you are still mourning.

Mourning times of course can vary from person to person. The closer the person who died or left you, the longer it takes to recover from the loss.

Remember, the person you lost will always be a part of the life you had. If you focus on the good that they brought to you and helped to shape you into a better person, be thankful that this person was ever a part of your life.

There is a reason this special individual was part of your life at that particular time. Hold on to the beauty of that wonderful and warm memory.

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