December Poem – In Drear-Nighted December

December snow scene painting by artist Kay Smith

December Snow Scene

December Snow Scene

In Drear-Nighted December

In drear-nighted December,

Too happy, happy tree,

Thy branches ne’er remember

Their green felicity:

The north cannot undo them

With a sleety whistle through them;

Nor frozen thawings glue them

From budding at the prime.

…………………………………………………..

In drear-nighted December,

Too happy, happy brook,

Thy bubblings ne’er remember

Apollo’s summer look;

But with a sweet forgetting,

They stay their crystal fretting,

Never, never petting

About the frozen time.

…………………………………………………

Ah! would ’twere so with many

A gentle girl and boy!

But were there ever any

Writhed not at passed joy?

The feel of not to feel it,

When there is none to heal it

Nor numbed sense to steel it,

Was never said in rhyme.

Written by John Keats

Poem Source: www.poetrysoup.com | Image Source: http://www.dailypainters.com

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Related Posts: December Fun Facts

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Brian Tracy – 21 Ways to Stop Procrastination

Procrastination - Now or Later?

Procrastination – Now or Later?

“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” – Charles Dickens, David Copperfield.

Procrastination is something we all indulge in, sometimes without even realizing it: so are you really getting the most out of your time?

“Eat that Frog – Get more of the important things done today” (published by Hodder) is a lovely easy read, written by Brian Tracy, who sets out a fantastic list of 21 ways to stop procrastinating.

  1. Set the Table: Decide exactly what you want. Clarity is essential. Write out your goals and objectives before you begin.
  2. Plan Every Day in Advance: Think on paper. Every minute you spend on planning can save you five or ten minutes in execution.
  3. Apply the 80/20 Rule to Everything: Twenty percent of your activities will account for 80 percent of your results. Always concentrate your efforts on that top 20 percent.
  4. Consider the Consequences: Your most important tasks and priorities are those that can have the most serious consequences, positive or negative, on your life or work. Focus on these above all else.
  5. Practice Creative Procrastination: Since you can’t do everything, you must learn to deliberately put off those tasks that are of low value so that you have enough time to do the few things that really count.
  6. Use the ABCDE Method Continually: Before you begin work on a list of tasks, take a few moments to organize them by value and priority so you can be sure of working on your important activities.
  7. Focus on Key Result Areas: Identify and determine those results that you absolutely, positively have to get to do your job well, and work on them all day long.
  8. The Law of Three: Identify the three things you do in your work that account for 90 percent of your contribution, and focus on getting them done before anything else. You will then have more time for your family and personal life.
  9. Prepare Thoroughly Before You Begin: Have everything you need at hand before you start. Assemble all the papers, information, tools, work materials, and numbers you might require so that you can get started and keep going.
  10. Take it One Oil Barrel at a Time: You can accomplish the biggest and most complicated job if you just complete it one step at a time.
  11. Upgrade Your Key Skills: The more knowledgeable and skilled you become at your key tasks, the faster you start them and the sooner you get them done.
  12. Leverage Your Special Talents: Determine exactly what it is that you are good at doing, or could be very good at, and throw your whole heart into doing those specific things very, very well.
  13. Identify Your Key Constraints: Determine the bottlenecks or choke points, internal or external that set the speed at which you achieve your most important goals, and focus on alleviating them.
  14. Put the Pressure on Yourself: Imagine that you have to leave town for a month, and work as if you had to get all your major tasks completed before you left.
  15. Maximize Your Personal Power: Identify your periods of highest mental and physical energy each day, and structure your most important and demanding tasks around these times. Get lots of rest so you can perform at your best.
  16. Motivate Yourself into Action: Be your own cheerleader. Look for the good in every situation. Focus on the solution rather than the problem. Always be optimistic and constructive.
  17. Get out of the Technological Time Sinks: Use technology to improve the quality of your communications, but do not allow yourself to become a slave to it. Learn to occasionally turn things off and leave them off.
  18. Slice and Dice the Task: Break large, complex tasks down into bite-sized pieces, and then do just one small part of the task to get started.
  19. Create Large Chunks of Time: Organize your days around large blocks of time where you can concentrate for extended periods on your most important tasks.
  20. Develop a Sense of Urgency: Make a habit of moving fast on your key tasks. Become known as a person who does things quickly and well.
  21. Single Handle every Task: Set Clear priorities, start immediately on you most important task, and then work without stopping until the job is 100 percent complete. This is the real key to high performance and maximum personal productively.

Brian Tracy Writes:

Make a decision to practice these principles every day until they become second nature to you. With these habits of personal management as a permanent part of your personality, your future success will be unlimited.

Image Source: http://today.duke.edu

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November Poem – My November Guest

November Image

November Image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My November Guest

My Sorrow, when she’s here with me,
Thinks these dark days of autumn rain
Are beautiful as days can be;
She loves the bare, the withered tree;
She walks the sodden pasture lane.

Her pleasure will not let me stay.
She talks and I am fain to list:
She’s glad the birds are gone away,
She’s glad her simple worsted grey
Is silver now with clinging mist.

The desolate, deserted trees,
The faded earth, the heavy sky,
The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eye for these,
And vexes me for reason why.

Not yesterday I learned to know
The love of bare November days
Before the coming of the snow,
But it were vain to tell her so,
And they are better for her praise

By Robert Frost

Poem Source:  www.allpoetry.com | Image Source: www.smashingmagazine.com

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Related Posts: November Fun Facts

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